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MDPD’s Reign of Terror: A Lack of Cultural Understanding?

By Chloe Herring | June 18th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Growing up as the significant elder of two younger brothers, it is striking to see the precautions my parents take to raise the two young, black men even in the 21st century. Even more disturbing is that for the black community there exist a common hyper-awareness of appropriate conduct in the presence of police. There is a universal understanding that black men shouldn’t run anywhere on the street for fear of police suspicion. My mother once told my brother never to believe that in the case of an altercation that police would let him go because he was “a nice kid.”

“They will slam your head on the cop car because you’re practically guilty until proven innocent,” she said. She explained to them, as many people believe, that black men cannot own large or luxury vehicles without the risk of becoming victim to racial profiling. Both of my brothers are under the age of fifteen.

It seemed difficult at first to believe that the police in Miami would engage in blatant, unacceptable, or racially-charged behavior considering the city’s hailed diversity. One of the four-pronged objectives of the Miami-Dade Police Department, according to the department’s government webpage, is to treat all people with respect through demonstrating an “understanding of ethnic and cultural diversity.” In fact, it would be difficult to authentically achieve the three other stated values of integrity, service and fairness without cultural understanding of the county’s diverse communities. However, the MDPD’s recent history of targeting a specific minority population does not uphold the standards they seek to meet.

The MDPD has led a legion of fatal attacks on black men, which may conjure the names of fallen men like DeCarlos Moore, Travis McNeil and Raymond Herrise. The recent arrest of a fourteen-year-old Tremaine McMillian for giving officers “dehumanizing stares” after verbal reprimand, only further validates the racially-charged persecution of black males that seems to be deeply imprinted in the county’s law enforcement agencies.

McMillian was roughhousing with another child on Haulover Beach this May but it was his body language while he was walking away that prompted police to “neutralize the threat” the teen caused by attacking and detaining him. The 2011 death of Raymond Herrise, who fell victim to over one-hundred bullets fired at his vehicle, was induced by what police officers say was a posed threat in a speeding car. Herrise’s car was actually at rest, according to footage from the incident, before several police shot and killed the man and injured four bystanders.

Community outcries of frustration at the MDPD’s questionably racist practices landed the department with a civil-rights investigation conducted by the U.S. Department of Justice late 2011.
But often overlooked by the MDPD’s plausible police stereotyping, a violation of civil rights that is still undergoing examination, is a critical component of the violence that police have taken on the very citizens they seek to protect: fear. A fear, often noted, that is unsupported by physical evidence or substantial reason; a fear that can most easily be described as rooted in an obvious lack of “understanding and cultural diversity.”

The message that the MDPD sends to the black community is hardly one of respect when their services include the scrutiny and persecution of black males.

With populations of racial minorities on the rise, incidents of targeted police brutality need to come to an end. It is impossible, ineffective and ultimately futile for a police force to adequately serve a community that they fail to understand. Officers should be educated on the history of police relationships with black people in efforts to understand the pain that shapes common perception about law enforcement. This is important because the history of police brutality in the black community is not exclusively the story of black people – it is a shared past of both parties. If police officers could first learn about the concerns of the people, then they could take the appropriate steps to actually perform their jobs.

Morning Headlines: June 17, 2013

By WVUM News Staff | June 17th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Here are some of the headlines that got our attention this morning:

President Obama spoke before a crowd of mostly young people in Northern Ireland overnight before the start of the two-day G8 summit.  His speech in Belfast comes ahead of talks scheduled for later today with British Prime Minister David Cameron.  One of the big topics of discussion at the G8 meeting will be the bloody civil war in Syria that is now in its third year.

Speaking of the President, recent controversies are weighing down his approval rating. This morning’s CNN/ORC International survey shows Obama’s approval rating at 45-percent. That’s down eight points since last month and it’s the President’s lowest approval rating in more than a year and a half.

Big cases may be soon decided in the Supreme Court.  Affirmative action is one and The U.S. Supreme Court could issue landmark rulings on same-sex marriage soon, as soon as today actually.  It’s the biggest civil rights issue to come before the high court in decades.  Justices have been considering two key cases.  One involves the constitutionality of the 1996 federal Defense of Marriage Act or DOMA [[ DOE-mah ]].  It defines marriage as a legal union between a man and a woman.  The second case involves California’s Proposition-8, a voter-approved measure which bans same-sex marriage.

Florida Senator Marco Rubio isn’t saying whether he’ll vote for a Senate immigration reform bill as-is.  The Florida Republican told ABC’s “This Week” the bill is an excellent “starting point,” but elements need to be improved.  Rubio dismissed speculation that he’s being used by Democrats to vote on softer immigration reform.  He said his priority is securing the border and preventing a future wave of illegal immigration.  Rubio is a key member of the Senate’s “Gang of Eight.”  The group has worked for months drafting a bipartisan immigration reform bill.

Miami Weather:  A mix of clouds and sun. A stray shower or thunderstorm is possible. High 88F. Winds ESE at 10 to 20 mph.

 

 

Editor’s Note:

Headlines collected via WVUM subscription to Metrosource news wire. Edited for flow, brevity (radio).

“*”- Denotes original reporting/content.

 

 

Counterpoint 06/14: The Relevance of Affirmative Action

By Meg McGee | Counterpoint | June 15th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Our debate on the relevance of affirmative action was easily one of the most heated ones we’ve ever had on the show (a clip is below). Race is always a tricky topic to talk about when many of the issues surrounding it remain unsolved in our country. But debates such as the one we had was one that needed to happen. People seldom confront the issue of race head-on in the media and we at Counterpoint were happy to be able to delve into such a subject.

With that said, I think its important for us (especially as Americans) to not think that because we are starting to see more black people in positions of power that we live in a “post-racial America”. Racism, particularly towards blacks remains an open wound that has not healed even after years of progress. Those who are not minorities may think, “How unfair, why is it necessary to still have these policies when we are not in the 60s?” It is easy to not understand the importance of such policies when you are not a black, Latino, or Asian in America.

Affirmative action opens doors for minorities and with that, it puts people of different backgrounds in settings such as a school or workplace. And in that setting we are confronted with race, we come face-to-face with the ugly history and reality of America. Once confronted with these themes, we can either continue with ignorance or learn to embrace differences with an open mind. Affirmative action is not some gateway for minorities to get whatever job they want or get into a good school without putting forth effort. Actually minorities have to work harder than anyone else to prove stereotypes wrong and break barriers.

 As I stated in the show, you cannot get into Harvard or some other Ivy League school with a bad GPA or test score, regardless of race. And as we all know from our experience of applying to various universities they look at more than just your test score. There’s essays, extracurricular activities, teacher recommendations, etc that also add to your application. So to say that the student at University of Texas was rejected solely on the premise that she’s white, is completely baseless. I can only hope that the Supreme Court will also understand the value of diversity in schools/workplace made possible by affirmative action.

 We should not undervalue or underestimate the importance of diversity. It’s one the reasons I chose UM, even though it still remains a majority white school. But UM still tries to value the diversity of its students by enrolling people of not just different races but also nationalities. Affirmative action is still a work in progress as many universities remain overwhelmingly white but the positives of these policies can be seen  in not just our elected officials like the president but in business, entertainment, and sports.

I’m proud to be a voice for blacks and women on Counterpoint and I hope that our show continues to challenge and inspire not just our contributors but our listeners as well.

 

Below is a clip of our discussion on the subject during our live show.  Counterpoint airs live Fridays at 1pm ET. 

Counterpoint Clip: Affirmative Action by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

The Farm Bill and Poverty in the United States

By Jordan Lewis | Counterpoint | June 14th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

 

This week, the U.S. Senate passed an extensive, 955 billion dollar Farm Bill package that will extend certain subsidies and crop insurance packages for the next 10 years. The Senate also cut $3.9 billion from Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, which allows low-income families to pay for food costs, through the food stamp program. The Republican-led House of Representatives voted on its own version, cutting food stamps by $20.5 billion over the next 10 years, denying 2 million people the food they need.  From a policy and an ethical standpoint, Congress erred by cutting SNAP considering that poverty has only worsened since the Great Recession.

Over time, food stamps were integrated as part of the Farm Bill as a means for urbanites to support the agricultural sector. While preserving family farms should be a focus of the government, much of our agricultural policy is rooted in giving subsidies to large corporations such as Monsanto, whose bottom line is enhanced by the American taxpayer. Other recipients of this money include wealthy landowners, such as Congressman Stephen Fincher (R-TN), who cited the Bible in his defense of cutting food stamps: (while pocketing $70,000 in farm subsidies) “The one who is unwilling to work shall not eat.”

Food stamps provide an important function in combating both urban and rural poverty. They not only provide additional resources for the user to pay for their other needs, but also help provide sensible nutrition, which will save us money in the long run. They also provide the biggest economic stimulus per dollar out of any policy the government could enact (multiplier effect of 1.73 per dollar spent). Americans think that hunger is a relic of the past, and while it is true that the United States produces a surplus of food, hunger is an everyday battle for many families. One out of five American children (16 million) struggle with hunger (No Kid Hungry). With extensive health and retirement benefits, and a healthy salary, most members of Congress are seemingly unaware of the challenges of surviving on food stamps. This week, nearly 30 congressmen will take the SNAP challenge and live on $4.50 a day, as 47 million Americans (1 in 7, half of whom are children) do. In many cases, SNAP isn’t enough, evidenced by record numbers serviced at food banks and other charities.

Furthermore, over half of Americans will spend a year under the poverty line. The government has the resources to combat poverty and has instead squandered it on corporate welfare, tax cuts for the wealthy, wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the drug war. The poor don’t have the political clout that America’s wealthy do. In an era where demagogues like Grover Norquist make any tax increase on America’s wealthiest an anathema, America’s poor are left to fight for themselves.

Over the last few years, conservatives have used welfare as a means to rile up their base and stoke racial divisions among Americans. In fact, the majority of welfare recipients are white, and working Americans. We’ve seen a rise in unemployment and a great increase in discouraged workers that artificially reduced the unemployment rate. Pension plans and other economic security measures have weakened over the last 10 years as employers look to cut back on expenses. Many Americans today work part-time jobs or work without a living wage, or suitable health care coverage. On this topic, the Florida Legislature voted to eliminate Miami-Dade County’s minimum wage provision that will only hurt the weakest in our society.

America’s working poor is growing and growing as the middle class has shrunk. Many workers are forced to take multiple jobs or make incredible sacrifices to make ends meet. The average Chartwells’ worker at UM makes less than $20,000 a year and often must rely on assistance programs to pay their mortgages, get health care, or eat.

If you thought that poverty in America was on the downturn, recent policy alternatives may make it worse.
The decline in unionization has cost millions of workers decent jobs, and the advent of Right to Work (for less) in states like Indiana (and already in Florida) will union and non-union workers alike.

The sequester has laid off millions of workers and hurt many more. Republican cuts to the social safety net have only worsened poverty.

A failure to pass a suitable immigration bill will jeopardize the prosperity of millions of Americans already here and allow owners the leverage to pay their legal workers less.

Unless Congress acts, the student loan interest rate will double to 6.8%, with student debt already surpassing $1 billion and difficult to remove even post-bankruptcy. (Our banks receive preferred rates of less than 1% from the Fed).
However, the biggest test to controlling poverty over the next generation is securing our entitlement programs. Republican ideas to reform our entitlement programs enrich the wealthy while damning the poor. Social Security has been the single-biggest anti-poverty measure undertaken, and have reduced poverty among our seniors by a wide margin. Medicare is effective, popular, and essential for our seniors’ health care needs. Finally, Medicaid provides vital health care to low income Americans. The refusal to take up Medicaid expansion paid for by the Affordable Care Act is a massive failure on the part of the Florida House and cuts millions off from health care coverage they need. Reducing entitlement benefits will only shrink the middle class and make the poor poorer.

We haven’t had a targeted approach to reducing poverty since Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society. Wall Street has recovered from the recession. The majority of Americans haven’t. Income inequality is at an all-time high, with record CEO compensation and giveaways to agribusiness and Big Oil. It’s time to address the problem that nobody really wants to talk about.  We need to make sure that our fellow Americans can lead dignified and prosperous lives. We have the both the means and moral responsibility to do so.

 

 Counterpoint airs Fridays at 1pm ET

 

Morning Headlines: June 14, 2013

By WVUM News Staff | June 14th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Here are the headlines we’re following this morning:

Britain’s foreign secretary says he agrees with the U.S. assessment that Syria has used chemical weapons against rebels. William Hague says the UK has presented evidence of the use of chemical weapons in Syria to UN investigators. Meanwhile, two senior western diplomats say the U.S. is looking into setting up a no-fly zone along Syria’s southern border, near Jordan.

It was exactly six months ago that 20 school children and six adults were shot to death at a school in Newtown, Connecticut.  A Twenty-year-old stormed Sandy Hook Elementary School on December 14th and opened fire in what would become the second deadliest school shooting in the United States.  He killed himself as police closed in.

The Disneyland employee accused of setting off dry ice bombs in that theme park is out of jail.  Christian Barnes was released on his own recognizance yesterday after a judge determined he is not a threat to the community.  The 22-year-old had been behind bars since May 28th, when he was arrested after allegedly setting off two dry ice bombs in the Mickey’s Toontown section of the park.  The judge said a subsequent search of Barnes’ car didn’t turn up any evidence the bombs were anything other than a bad idea for a joke.

A restaurant deck collapsed into  Biscayne Bay, injuring at least two dozen people, three of them critically last night.  Rescue divers and helicopters were sent to the scene at the Shuckers restaurant in North Bay Village and authorities say everyone is accounted for.  No word yet on what caused the collapse that happened as patrons were watching the Heat take on San Antonio in Game Four of the NBA Finals.  A game which they won, 109,93!

Miami Weather: Partly cloudy with a slight chance of thunderstorms. High 88F. Winds WSW at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 30%.

 

Editor’s Note:

Headlines collected via WVUM subscription to Metrosource news wire. Edited for flow, brevity (radio).

“*”- Denotes original reporting/content.

The NSA Leaks A Week Later: What Next?

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | June 13th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Over the weekend it was revealed that the whistleblower behind the NSA leaks was a man named Edward Snowden. Snowden is presumably in Hong Kong, although there hasn’t been any confirmation yet, other than the fact that he checked out of a hotel there recently. There has also been chatter about Snowden having a bid for political asylum, though there has been no official confirmation or denial of such asylum at the time of writing, be it from China, Iceland, or Russia, the three nations allegedly weighing the possibility, with only Russia officially “considering” asylum.

 

That’s all well and good, but what about his homeland, the U.S.? Already, some members of congress are calling for his head, Obama is trying to do damage control, and as stated above, Snowden isn’t even in the country. On the other side, there is already a whitehouse.gov petition to pardon him, even without any charge of wrongdoing so far, and privacy advocates are taking a break from performing the “I Told You So Dance” to show support of the person behind the information.

 

I don’t want this to be another article entirely about whistleblowers, so I’ll shift to the leaks themselves–I wrote last week about the notion that some things shouldn’t be classified to begin with, but this leak goes beyond that. The PRISM program and the Verizon (and I would assume other major telecoms companies) data mining efforts shouldn’t have even been started, and for revealing them, I thank Snowden very much.

 

I believe the best part of these leaks is the re-ignition of the discussion of privacy vs. safety: at what point does “anti-terrorism” become too invasive? At some point during the show last week, I asked “what terrorism?” and by that I was questioning how many terrorism plots were, or even could be, foiled by this type of surveillance. I realize that the CIA/FBI/DHS/etc. have to keep some things secret, but I believe that if they want to even propose this type of surveillance, there had better be concrete, publicly available evidence that it works, and even then, there is no reason that the government needs the metadata on every call. Heck, I call in to Counterpoint from over 1500 miles away for an hour once a week, and I’m sure that could be construed as “odd,” even though I can say with 100% certainty that I am not a terrorist.

 

But what about the one in a million who is a terrorist? Surely we can’t just let him/her continue uninhibited. Do we trust that the government and police can catch most of them? Do we trust each other to be on the lookout for bomb/etc. factories across the country? In all honesty, I don’t know what we can do to stop terrorist attacks from ever happening again, but just because there isn’t an alternative idea at this point in time does not make the surveillance state is a good idea. I can live with the current airport security; it’s a pain, but it’s only a little overzealous. I can get behind the occasional wiretap, but I think a warrant should be required beforehand. I draw the line at the public camera system/Trapwire and Internet monitoring in any form; the first is far too invasive, and the second is too easy for the actual intended targets to circumvent and only harms the bystanders.

 

We have to accept that there are people out there that want to hurt us, be it from some bastardized form of an otherwise peaceful religion, or from run-of-the-mill psychopathy, and I’ll admit that I don’t know how to stop them 100% of the time, but what I do know is that turning America into an Orwellian state out of fear of terrorism would be “letting the terrorists win,” and I’m sure I’m blowing these programs a little out of proportion, but one of the hallmarks of such a state is total surveillance, which, thanks to Snowden, we know is closer than we thought it was last week.

Morning Headlines: June 11, 2013

By WVUM News Staff | June 11th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Here are some of the headlines we’re following this morning:

Federal authorities are working to file charges against the government contractor who told the news media about secret surveillance programs.  Edward Snowden provided documents about the programs to “The Guardian” and the “Washington Post.”  The 29-year-old Snowden flew to Hong Kong and has since dropped out of sight.  There are reports that the government could strengthen its case for extraditing Snowden if it first charges him with a crime.  Some members of Congress have accused him of treason.  Snowden told “The Guardian” he might seek asylum in Iceland.

The organization that manages organ transplants across the U.S. will not change the rules regarding children under 12.  However, it will create a special appeal process.  Last week, the parents of a dying ten-year-old Pennsylvania girl successfully took their case to a judge, who agreed to put the child on the list for an adult lung transplant.

The Obama administration is no longer trying to block over-the-counter purchases of the morning after pill.  That means any woman or girl will soon have the ability to walk into a pharmacy and purchase the pill, Plan B One-Step, without a prescription.  The Department of Justice is dropping its appeal of a judge’s order to make the drug more widely available.  DOJ had been battling to prevent that.

In Florida today, the process of picking a jury in the murder trial of George Zimmerman resumed this morning.  Only four people were questioned in court Monday.  Lawyers are working to get a panel of six and four alternates.  They’re to decide if George Zimmerman is guilty of second-degree murder in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.

Miami Weather: Partly cloudy with isolated thunderstorms possible. High 86F. Winds SE at 5 to 10 mph. Chance of rain 30%.

 

Editor’s Note:

Headlines collected via WVUM subscription to Metrosource news wire. Edited for flow, brevity (radio).

“*”- Denotes original reporting/content.

 

 

Morning Headlines- June 10, 2013

By WVUM News Staff | June 10th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Here are some of the headlines we’re following this morning:

The “Guardian” newspaper has identified the man who leaked top secret documents about the NSA’s controversial spying program as a former technical assistant with the CIA.  Twenty-nine-year-old Edward Snowden worked for defense contractor Booze Allen Hamilton.  Snowden provided the documents to the “Guardian,” which published a report that exposed the NSA for engaging in the secret collection of Americans’ phone and email records.  Snowden told the Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald in an interview that took place in Hong Kong that he’s afraid for his safety, but is comfortable with the decision he made.

Thousands of Syrian refugees could make the U.S. their new home.  The “Los Angeles Times” is reporting the Obama administration is weighing whether to bring some of the Syrians who’ve fled their wartorn country to the U.S.  It would be part of an international effort aimed at helping Middle Eastern countries where about one-point-six million Syrians are now living as Syria’s civil war rages on.  UN officials are planning to discuss how the mass resettlement might be carried out when they hold a meeting this week in Geneva.  Some of the states that previously have taken foreign refugees under UN resettlement plans are California, Illinois, , Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia…and Florida.

The Senate continues debating a comprehensive immigration reform bill this week.  The bipartisan measure was crafted by a so-called Gang of Eight in the Senate and provides a path to citizenship for more than 10-million undocumented immigrants in the U.S.  Critics call it amnesty.  Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid hopes to finish the bill by the July 4th recess.  President Obama is pushing lawmakers to approve immigration reform but has not been involved in the details of the legislation.

Jury selection will begin today in the second-degree murder trial of George Zimmerman.  The former Florida neighborhood watch volunteer is accused of killing 17-year-old Trayvon Martin.  Zimmerman claims he shot Martin in self-defense while the two were wrestling for Zimmerman’s gun.

Miami Weather: A mix of clouds and sun. A stray shower or thunderstorm is possible. High 88F. Winds ESE at 10 to 20 mph.

 

Editor’s Note:

Headlines collected via WVUM subscription to Metrosource news wire. Edited for flow, brevity (radio).

“*”- Denotes original reporting/content.

Counterpoint Recap 06/08: PRISM and Privacy

By Meg McGee | Counterpoint | June 9th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Photo Credit: The Young Turks

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On Friday, the Counterpoint team had a field day with the news that NSA has a program, PRISM, which listens to phone calls a la Verizon and stores information through frequently visited websites such as Facebook and Google. Most of us came to the consensus that the government doesn’t care about your photos from that keg party you went to freshman year. (Unless that keg party was hosted by al-Qaeda)

Jordan (Counterpoint contributor), however, stressed that this was a severe violation of Americans’ privacy and Constitutional rights. National security policies like this are an extension of the Bush-era Patriot Act and make us all question: what happened to Obama’s vision of “change”? The more we learn about Obama, the more we see the lines are blurring between him and former President Bush. While Obama’s rhetoric on national security issues are much more rooted in liberalism, he continues to extend and expand Bush-era foreign policy (Can you say drone program? Gitmo? Counterinsurgency?)

Mr. Obama, your words and your actions are saying two different things. We all knew he was a bit naïve and optimistic, but we still put our faith in yet another leader to get us out of crisis. In defense of Obama, I’ll say that once you become president and are continuously briefed on every possible national security threat, you may not be singing “Kumbaya” when thousands of American lives are at risk—including your own. I don’t know this from personal experience but we can only give the President the benefit of the doubt.

My question for the American people that are upset over the PRISM program is this: If you feel this is a violation of your rights, what do you plan on doing to fix it?

Will you go out and protest like our Turkish cousins in Istanbul? Where something as simple as the demolition of a park, ignited a larger-movement against a government encroaching on their citizens’ democratic rights. Are you ready to get hit with tear gas and water cannons? Or will you just gripe about it over Facebook and over the coffee table?

Call me when you have an answer. Remember, Obama is listening.

 

Listen to a clip of our discussion of this topic on the show below.  Counterpoint airs live every Friday from 1-2pm ET.

Counterpoint Clip: NSA Surveillance by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Morning Headlines: June 7, 2013

By WVUM News Staff | June 7th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Here are the headlines we’re following this morning:

Even more revelations are coming in regarding the secret collection of data on millions of Americans by the NSA, or National Security Administration.  Yet another leak has revealed that Federal investigators are gathering information on Americans by secretly mining the nation’s biggest Internet companies. The “Washington Post”  and The Guardian were the first to  report that the National Security Agency and the FBI are behind the highly classified program code-named PRISM. The report says agencies can tap into nine leading U.S. Internet companies and pull audio, video, photographs, emails and other information that can allow agencies to track a person.

Israel is building a 45-mile fence along the Syrian border in the occupied Golan Heights.  Apparently the government’s intent is to keep the Syrian civil war, jihadist terrorists or Lebanese Hezbollah fighters from spilling into Israel.  The “smart fence” comes with razor wire and more high-tech items such as touch sensors, motion detectors and ground radar.

One day after the family of a ten-year-old Pennsylvania girl successfully sued to be placed on an adult transplant list, another patient is suing over the same thing.  Under national health guidelines, children under 12 are not eligible for transplants from adult donors.  The children of both of these families are fighting cystic fibrosis and they are hoping for a chance to save their daughter’s lives.

Soaking rains will drench the East Coast today as Tropical Storm Andrea loses strength.  Flash flood watches are in effect in more than a dozen states from Georgia to Maine.  The area includes Washington, DC, which forecasters say could get as much as half-a-foot of rain today.  Flash flood warnings stretch from Florida, where Andrea made landfall yesterday, up the coast all the way to Virginia.

As far as local weather in Miami, expect scattered thunderstorms, especially during the afternoon hours. High 87F. Winds SSW at 10 to 15 mph. Chance of rain 50%.

 

Programming note:  Tune in to Counterpoint, live today at 1pm!

 

Editor’s Note:

Headlines collected via WVUM subscription to Metrosource news wire. Edited for flow, brevity (radio).

“*”- Denotes original reporting/content.