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Counterpoint April 25th

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | May 1st, 2014 |

(Image credit: Electric Choice)

This week, we talked Affirmative Action, money in education, and conservatives in education. The question of how to improve racial relations is always a tricky one, and I thought Nicole and Jordan pulled off the discussion very well for this touchy subject. We then touched on the Kochs’ donations and ensuing veto power (and subsequent removal of said veto power) at FSU concerning the hiring process for professors. This led into a discussion about conservatives in academia in general. No surprise: college campuses are usually liberal. A relatively similar argument as the first half: what, if anything, should we be doing to promote diversity– in this case, diversity of opinion– in college? The questions were big– too big to cover in a short hour-long show, so maybe we’ll do a special on it sometime, but for now, the debate rages on.

I digress: catch a replay of the show after the break. Keep it locked.

Counterpoint April 25th by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Counterpoint April 18th

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | April 20th, 2014 |

(Image credit: Modern Survival Blog)

 

This week, we touched on the Ukrainian situation concerning the pamphlets handed out to Jews “encouraging” them to register as such with the officials. Next, we covered the Nevada Rancher standoff and discussed how much power the government should be able to wield against its own citizens to uphold the law. We also talked about the Pope and the evolution of the Catholic Church (pun intended). After that, since it was a slow news week, we gave the floor to Nicole to talk about couponing, both regular and extreme. Anyways, for a recap, hit the jump after the break–

Counterpoint April 18th by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Counterpoint April 11: Sebelius Resignation, Miami-Dade Voting Rights Concerns

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | April 11th, 2014 |

(Image Credit: Wikipedia)

This week, we talked about the Sebelius resignation and various voting rights issues, stemming from the recent rule for Miami-Dade concerning bathrooms. I was incorrect in saying that it prohibited people from stepping out of line, and it apparently is about whether or not the buildings where people go to vote are required to provide access to bathrooms, specifically, handicap-accessible restrooms.

Catch the replay after the break. Keep it locked.

Counterpoint 4-4-14: “Cuban Twitter” and SCOTUS on Political Donations

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | April 5th, 2014 |

 

(Image credit: Living Green)

 

Today, we took on the SCOTUS ruling that set the stage for unlimited political donations. As expected, Jordan opposed and Nicole agreed. Are corporations people? I’m inclined to say no. As for the “money-in-politics” question? I’m actually not too bothered by it; I’d support a flat-amount or a total cap, but that seems rather idealistic. As-is, as much as people complain about it, money in politics kind of keeps the whole game going. I digress; the other part of the show focused on the recent reveal of the “Cuban Twitter” launched by the U.S. I honestly don’t feel too strongly on the subject because the Castro regime isn’t exactly conducive to U.S. interests, nor to the interests of the people. That said, it was probably an over-reach and we probably shouldn’t be launching psy-ops quite so loosely– especially without presidential approval, as recent reports allege. Anyways, catch the re-cap after the break. Keep it locked.

Counterpoint 4/4/14 by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Counterpoint March 21st: Crimea & Elections feat. Alex & Meg

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | March 22nd, 2014 |

(Image Credit: Wikipedia)

So this week, we talked about Crimea again. We had previous Counterpointers Alex and Meg join us and weigh in. The conversation seemed to be heading towards “it’s not our problem,” a viewpoint shared by one of my personal heroes, Ron Paul. After that, we moved to the Jolly/Sink election, and good ‘ol Reps vs. Dems in various upcoming elections. Shout-out to Meg McGee, our previous host, and Alex Alduncin, a previous commentator, for coming on the show. We also had a higher-that-normal volume of listener texts (which we love). Anyways, if you missed it and want a replay, hit the jump below–

Counterpoint 3/7/14: Ukraine, State of the State, & House of Cards, feat. Kamila Orlova

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | March 8th, 2014 |

 

(Image credit: Operation World)

 

This week, we were luck enough to have Kamila Orlova, a student here at UM who hailed from Russia, to speak with us about the Ukrainian situation. Additionally, I let Jordan rant about his gripes with Florida Governor Rick Scott, and for the last few minutes of the show, we talked about the first season of House of Cards (we will talk about the second season in the near future). Discussion was good, as usual, even though we were missing our usual conservative commentators, but I thought I played a decent devil’s advocate to bridge the gap. Anyways, hit the jump below to listen to the show. Keep it locked.

Counterpoint 2/28: Clinton Visits UM, Arizona and Venezuela

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | February 28th, 2014 |

(Photo credit: history.com)

This week, we discussed Hillary Clinton’s visit to UM (she did not announce, unfortunately), the Arizona governor’s veto of a broadly worded bill that some say would have legalized prejudice against homosexuals by business owners, and the precarious situation in Venezuela. Hit the jump for the audio–

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton Speaks at the University of Miami by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Brazil to Defend Against NSA Snooping

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | October 15th, 2013 |

 

[Image Credit: Carolyn Kaster/AP]

Over the weekend, Brazil announced its plans to throw off the NSA’s ability to snoop in on their internal affairs. The system is still in development, but the idea is that a new form of secure communication is being developed that will not allow traditional NSA intrusions into it. The move comes after revelations that the NSA had infiltrated Brazilian governmental communications. An email system with the same intent is being developed for the public.

If only the same was happening in the U.S… But oh well, I’m relatively happy for Brazil actually doing something about the NSA. This brings up the idea of extra-legal justice: since the NSA is actively violating legal and moral standards, it is certainly acceptable to abandon diplomatic channels and solve the problem unilaterally. A similar solution needs to be developed in the U.S. I’ve put forth the needs for privacy before, so I’ll keep it short– it’s not just the idea that you’re being watched, it’s the mentality that comes with it: that one will never truly be able to create/express themselves freely without the threat of silent eyes judging them from some dark cubicle in some data center. It may seem like some paranoid musing, but we’ve seen after the Snowden leaks that at the very least, it’s not out of the question.

Anyways, it’s a slow news cycle: anything other than the debt ceiling, the shutdown, or the ensuing bickering that comes with it has been pushed way off to the side. Don’t forget to tune in Friday, when we’ll be talking about all of the above and more.

 

COUNTERPOINT airs Fridays at 1pm EST.

The iPhone 5s: the Start of Widespread Genetic Tech?

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | September 25th, 2013 |

(Image credit: The Denver Post)

 

In case you missed it, the new iPhone went on sale recently. Normally this wouldn’t be even remotely newsworthy, but this iPhone is different: it comes with a fingerprint sensor.

The iPhone 5s (Apple’s latest offering) is able to read and store the fingerprint of the owner and if chosen, other people as well. I can’t possibly be the only one who smells something fishy here: hot on the heels of the Snowden leaks, the new must-have product just so happens to have this technology?

“But so what?” you say. It’s just a fingerprint, and those are taken all the time; for jobs, arrests, etc. so why does this even matter? Personally, I don’t think the actual data does, after all, I just said fingerprints are taken all the time, but this is huge for the “surveillance culture” we have creeping up on us: for the first time ever, there is the widespread use of a technology that uses a genetic marker to identify people on a regular basis. While I’ll admit that “fingerprints” and “genetic marker” generally aren’t lumped together as synonymous, “DNA” and “genetic marker” usually are, and that’s what this technology is paving the way for. That sounds far off into the future, but DNA-verification has been around for a while, it’s only a matter of time before it reaches the general public. What’s more, while it’s not generally accepted that specific genetic information can be reliably determined from a fingerprint, DNA-verification could pave the way for corporations to target ads with precision the likes of which has never been seen before on this Earth. Got a cold? (For those not familiar, the common cold– like any virus– can actually make slight alterations to genes) Your iPhone 151s could one day be offering you coupons for CVS before you know you’re sick.

Something to ponder as you go about your day.

From Under the Bridge to Into Our Hard Drives: Patent Trolls

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | September 13th, 2013 |

(Image credit: iDownloadBlog)

 

You might be wondering “what on Earth is a patent troll?”, so I’ll tell you– “patent troll” is a label for any person/company/firm/etc. that makes a business of threatening to people for alleged patent infringement: almost homogeneously, these people buy patents from other companies/inventors with absolutely zero intention of using the patents for anything other than ammunition for litigation (not to be confused with the MPAA, the RIAA, or the copyright system in general). Rather than using patents in their intended manner– to ensure an inventor has time to complete his/her invention– the patent troll uses the temporary legal monopoly granted with a patent as a means to extort money from inventors who come up with new ideas/inventions or extensions on previous ideas/inventions that may at first glance seem similar to the patents which the patent trolls hold. It is estimated that any actual litigation that is brought by patent trolls and does not get settled before a court battle leads to the patent trolls losing over 75% of the time.

The patent trolls are not a new phenomenon, but they certainly have grown to prominence since the rise of big software. Software development is unique in that software’s “life” goes by considerably faster than most physical items and it is often the case that something becomes standardized in a fraction of the time of physical items. This creates the opportunity for mass patent trolling: if someone obtains a patent for a piece of software that has become a standard before the patent has expired, it is incredibly likely that someone somewhere has made an improvement on that standard, and since this improvement was not done by the patent holder, the patent troll has a prime opportunity to launch a legal missile. Another litigation-mongering opportunity occurs when a piece of closed-sourced software (not free for everyone to tinker with) resembling an open-sourced software (free for everyone to tinker with) that is not well known gets a patent, and since the open-sourced software wasn’t patented, the new patent owner can try to sue, even if the closed-source software was developed after the invention or even adoption as a standard.

These scenarios sound perfectly viable for patent trolls, but in reality, the “perfect patent troll situation” rarely occurs. Most often, the later example– of closed-source software patents being used to attack open-sourced software– is the case. Or not at all; sometimes the patent trolls simply choose someone who has just enough money to pay a settlement, but not enough to want to go to war with the patent trolls, which can get pretty costly, easily reaching the millions mark for a regular patent case. This is where the problem lies: the immoral patent trolls lose over 75% of the time, but simply by bringing a suit, they are almost guaranteed a settlement because the target often won’t be able to afford a lawsuit, even if they are innocent.

The solution? Make it so that it’s in the patent trolls best interest to be actually right about bringing a suit. Make it so that the plaintiff pays the fees if the case is found to be a pile of garbage. This would make it so that the average target of the patent trolls would be able to go to court and win ~75% of the time. This isn’t a fix in itself, but it’s a start. To be honest, I think the entire patent system is far outdated and needs to be updated from scratch to the modern world. Somewhere in that reform, I think the best way to stop wrong patent lawsuits is to place risk on the accuser as opposed to how it is now where the risk is all on the defendant. As a side note, it would be nice if there were no software patents, given the building-block nature of software itself, but I seriously doubt that a majority would go along with removing patents for software.