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RadioActive—Flip the What? Shaking up the classroom and how we think about learning

By Michael Matthiesen | September 15th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Traditional classroom environments have become incredibly normalized in how they are thought about and how they look all the way from kindergarten through our higher education – A new movement in Education challenges the “normal” way of doing/teaching/learning and is instead opting to “Flip the Classroom”. This week on RadioActive, we dug into the Flipped Classroom and the concept of Critical Pedagogy with Lindsay Buckingham-Rivard, a college instructor in Canada, who is pushing the boundaries of her classroom to try new and creative ways of engaging in learning with her students. She shared her perspectives, her pedagogy and examples from her classroom to highlight the different facets of this new Educational Movement

RadioActive—Flip the What? Shaking up the classroom and how we think about learning by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Lauren’s Story: A Talk On Childhood Sexual Abuse

By WVUM News Staff | August 4th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Lauren Book, founder of Lauren’s Kids, was a victim of childhood sexual abuse for six years at the hands of her nanny. Armed with the knowledge that 95 percent of sexual abuse is preventable through education and awareness, Lauren has worked to turn her horrific personal experience into a vehicle to prevent childhood sexual abuse and heal survivors by starting Lauren’s Kids. Lauren’s Kids encourages victims to “shine a light in dark places” and “shed the shame.”

An official 501(c)3, Lauren’s Kids is based in South Florida and educates adults and children about sexual abuse prevention through in-school curriculum, awareness campaigns and speaking engagements around the country and world. Lauren’s Kids holds an annual, statewide “Walk in My Shoes” event, which brings together survivors and advocates on a 1,500-mile walk across Florida to raise awareness and promote supportive legislation. The foundation has helped advocate for the passage of more than two dozen laws to support survivors and protect children from predators.

Lauren’s Story by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

WVUM News Reports: Are Students Enrolling in Obamacare?

By Hyan Freitas | News Director | November 22nd, 2013 |

In 2012 our nation witnessed history in the making when President Obama‘s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was made law. Last june, the Supreme Court upheld the premise of Obamacare, which applied a penalty to people who do not purchase health insurance.  Now with the law in place, the success of public health care rides on the enrollment of young adults under the age of 35 to offset the cost of health insurance for the elderly. How do University of Miami students feel about this? WVUM News reporter Chloe Herring finds out student opinions on this and some other key controversial issues regarding Obamacare.

 

WVUM News Reports: Are Students Enrolling in Obamacare? by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

 

Full Show

TWV: NGOs and Haiti, UM Students and Obamacare by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Counterpoint 11/01: Jackson Hospital Referendum

By Meg McGee | Counterpoint | November 1st, 2013 |

This week on Counterpoint, we sat down with UM alumni and law student, Tara Irani about the upcoming referendum to fund upgrades to Jackson Hospital.

Counterpoint 11/01: Jackson Hospital by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

RadioActive: Stem Cells and Nicotine

By Michael Matthiesen | October 28th, 2013 |

Americans understand smoking is bad, but, how bad is a fairly gray area. Biomedical Engineering PhD candidate Carlos Carballosa and UM Miller School of Medicine spearheaded brand new research on how nicotine hinders the role stem cells play when recovering from an injury. Carlos’ research has found that the more nicotine in your system, the longer the recovery.

RadioActive: Stem Cells and Nicotine by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

WVUM NEWS Special: End of the NCAA-UM Saga

By WVUM News Staff | October 24th, 2013 |

Chris Wittyngham, WVUM Sports director, reporting:

After years as a football program, a university, and a leadership structure in flux, the NCAA finally handed down sanctions to the University of Miami in relation to the Nevin Shapiro allegations. Many of those allegations were proven true in the report from the Committee on Infractions, but a combination of self-imposed penalties and a tainted investigation by the NCAA allowed Miami to get handed relatively tame penalties.

The most relevant penalties are 9 scholarship reductions over 3 years for the football program, 3 scholarship reductions over 3 years for the basketball program, and a 3 year probationary period that begun Wednesday. With the conclusion of the investigation and the process with the NCAA, Miami will be looking on to several things.

The first is a period for the football program that will hopefully thrive for the first time in a long time. Miami heads into the weekend at 6-0 and ranked #7 in the BCS rankings. Now that this cloud of uncertainty has been lifted, it certainly will allow the program to operate more effective.

Second is a period of further compliance, something discussed by UM President Donna Shalala and Athletic Director Blake James ad nauseam in the aftermath of the announcement. They understand that they simply cannot allow this to happen again and have already implemented measures to do so.

Third is moving on. This era of Miami Hurricanes history has been largely mired by this scandal and it has hung over everything athletically and otherwise that has happened at the University. All parties involved will be glad to move on.

WVUM Special Report–End of the NCAA-UM Saga by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

RadioActive: Bi-Directional Flying and What it Means to be a Gringo.

By Michael Matthiesen | October 18th, 2013 |

RadioActive welcomes University of Miami’s Dr. Ge-Chen Zha and freelance writer for NPR Aida Ramirez. A College of Engineering professor, Dr. Zha was awarded $100,000 grant from NASA’s prestigious Innovative Advanced Concepts program to create a supersonic, bi-directional flying wing (SBiDir-FW) that looks like something out of Star Wars. Dr. Zha’s fuel-efficient supersonic jet is capable of taking passengers to destinations in less time than current conventional aircraft.

Aida Ramirez, a Miami native and UM Young alum, will be discussing “Who, Exactly, Is A Gringo?” – her article that was published by NPR, together with how the slang term has evolved overtime and who may classify as a gringo in the future.

RadioActive: Bi-Directional Flying and What it Means to be a Gringo. by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

RadioActive: The YES Institute (ft. Jasmine Rosa)

By Michael Matthiesen | October 17th, 2013 |

RadioActive is joined by the YES Institute as we discuss their efforts to prevent suicide and ensure the healthy development of all youth through powerful communication and education on gender and orientation. The YES Institute separates gender, sex, and orientation in a way that creates an understanding for the LGBT community in the society that we live in, even among some religious groups. RadioActive was also joined by guest host Jasmine Rosa, a graduate student in the Community and Social Change program.

RadioActive: Bi-Directional Flying and What it Means to be a Gringo. by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Brazil to Defend Against NSA Snooping

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | October 15th, 2013 |

 

[Image Credit: Carolyn Kaster/AP]

Over the weekend, Brazil announced its plans to throw off the NSA’s ability to snoop in on their internal affairs. The system is still in development, but the idea is that a new form of secure communication is being developed that will not allow traditional NSA intrusions into it. The move comes after revelations that the NSA had infiltrated Brazilian governmental communications. An email system with the same intent is being developed for the public.

If only the same was happening in the U.S… But oh well, I’m relatively happy for Brazil actually doing something about the NSA. This brings up the idea of extra-legal justice: since the NSA is actively violating legal and moral standards, it is certainly acceptable to abandon diplomatic channels and solve the problem unilaterally. A similar solution needs to be developed in the U.S. I’ve put forth the needs for privacy before, so I’ll keep it short– it’s not just the idea that you’re being watched, it’s the mentality that comes with it: that one will never truly be able to create/express themselves freely without the threat of silent eyes judging them from some dark cubicle in some data center. It may seem like some paranoid musing, but we’ve seen after the Snowden leaks that at the very least, it’s not out of the question.

Anyways, it’s a slow news cycle: anything other than the debt ceiling, the shutdown, or the ensuing bickering that comes with it has been pushed way off to the side. Don’t forget to tune in Friday, when we’ll be talking about all of the above and more.

 

COUNTERPOINT airs Fridays at 1pm EST.

#UnitedWeServe: The Case for National Service

By Michael Matthiesen | October 10th, 2013 |

Since their inception programs like Peace Corp and AmeriCorps have been very popular alternative options for recent college graduates (famously President Donna Shalala was among the first Peace Corps members sent abroad). With the good each program is doing, and it’s growing popularity, the case for Universal Service has been made by powerhouses like Sen. Ted Kennedy and General Stanley McChrystal and seems to be gaining steam. Is Universal Service something that can become common place in the lives of Americans? Kevin Bulger from ServiceNation will be a guest on RadioActive to discuss the case for Universal Service: it’s history, impact, and future.

RadioActive: #UnitedWeServe – The Case for Universal Service by Wvumnews on Mixcloud