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Archive for the ‘Misc.’ Category

Counterpoint April 18th

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | April 20th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

(Image credit: Modern Survival Blog)

 

This week, we touched on the Ukrainian situation concerning the pamphlets handed out to Jews “encouraging” them to register as such with the officials. Next, we covered the Nevada Rancher standoff and discussed how much power the government should be able to wield against its own citizens to uphold the law. We also talked about the Pope and the evolution of the Catholic Church (pun intended). After that, since it was a slow news week, we gave the floor to Nicole to talk about couponing, both regular and extreme. Anyways, for a recap, hit the jump after the break–

Counterpoint April 18th by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

RadioActive—Through the Looking Glass: Postmodernism, Western Culture, and Religion in America.

By Michael Matthiesen | April 13th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

The Western World today is characterized by a post-modern identity — the idea that we are able to form our own realities and that truth is a subjective perception changing from person to person. The idea of “multiple truths” has lead to national policies such as secularism. But how does America’s post-modern reflexes frame our view of religion? Jacob Quinlan joined us on-air to explain.

RadioActive—Through the Looking Glass: Postmodernism, Western Culture, and Religion in America. by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

HOPE: Housing Opportunities Project for Excellence, Inc.

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | March 15th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Housing Discrimination affects more than the direct victims; it impacts the whole community and society at large. Education is one of the most important keys to eliminating housing discrimination. HOPE, Inc. is increasing its outreach campaigns to educate more housing providers across the County. In 2013, HOPE, Inc. delivered fair housing training to nearly 200 housing providers in Broward County. “Housing providers” could refer to private realtors, homeowner associations, condo boards, co-op governing boards, mortgage lenders, banks, landlords, etc.

The amended federal Fair Housing Act prohibits nationally, any discrimination in the sale, rental, lending, insurance, or advertising of housing on the basis of: race, color, national origin, religion, disability, sex, and familial status. Rob Collins joins me to talk about what to do when encountering housing discrimination.

HOPE: Housing Opportunities Project for Excellence, Inc. by Michelle Marie Mlacker on Mixcloud

RadioActive—STEP-HIA: The Studying Trail Enhancement Plans-Health Impact Assessment

By Michael Matthiesen | February 24th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

According to Human Impact Partners, Health Impact Assessment is a practical tool that uses data, research and stakeholder input to determine a policy or project’s impact on the health of a population. HIAs also provide recommendations to address these impacts. STEP-HIA is a project being conducted by a research team at the University of New Mexico which aims to look at how increasing access to the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail through smaller connector trails and trailheads will positively affect the health, quality of life, and social, economic and community capital. Danielle Parker will be on-air to explain.

RadioActive —STEP-HIA: The Studying of the Trail Enhancement Plan’s -Health Impact Assessment by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Counterpoint 01/24/14

By Meg McGee | Counterpoint | January 24th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

The Counterpoint team discusses the GOP’s “war on women” which leads to a broader discussion of if our student activity fees should cover the free condoms offered in the Wellness Center and Health Center at UM.

Counterpoint 01/24/14 by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Counterpoint 01/17/14

By Meg McGee | Counterpoint | January 20th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

A Counterpoint alum, Alex Alduncin joins us on the show as we debate news worthy events from the week of 01/13. Features special audio from WVUM News’ Hyan Freitas and Republican correspondent Nicole Marcos interview with Olympia Snowe.

Counterpoint 01/17/14 by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

RadioActive—Backlogged: Changing the Miami-Dade County Family Court System

By Michael Matthiesen | January 20th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

As a court of first and last resort — the family court system in Miami-Dade County is over burdened. When the United States has a 34% divorce rate — funding and time becomes an issue for the courts when handeling topics like domestic violence, timesharing, and child support. Former Chief Judge Joel H. Brown for the 11th Circuit Court will speak on-air about the problems the family court system faces, and what can be done to solve them.

RadioActive—A Game of Chicken: The World of Prediction Markets

By Michael Matthiesen | January 13th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Florida during Hurricane season relies on prediction markets. The safety of Floridians and their livelihood depend on it. If a prediction is wrong, it could mean dire consequences. In 1992, forecasters didn’t predict that Hurricane Andrew would hit South Florida. But have you ever thought about how prediction markets work? Private sector vs. Government predictions, and the economics behind it? UM Business School’s Dr. David Kelly will be on Sunday to explain.

Dr. David L. Kelly is a professor of economics and the director of economics graduate studies at the University of Miami. He was chair of the economics department from 2005-8 and has formerly held positions at the University of California at Santa Barbara and Carnegie Mellon University. He has published widely on liquidity in financial markets, prediction markets, economic growth and the environment, the economics of climate change, and the design of regulation. His research has been funded by NSF, DOE, and other federal agencies and has been featured on NPR Marketplace, Discovery Channel, Bloomberg, and AP. He is a member of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, and the American Economics Association.

RadioActive—A Game of Chicken: The World of Prediction Markets by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

MDPD’s Reign of Terror: A Lack of Cultural Understanding?

By Chloe Herring | June 18th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Growing up as the significant elder of two younger brothers, it is striking to see the precautions my parents take to raise the two young, black men even in the 21st century. Even more disturbing is that for the black community there exist a common hyper-awareness of appropriate conduct in the presence of police. There is a universal understanding that black men shouldn’t run anywhere on the street for fear of police suspicion. My mother once told my brother never to believe that in the case of an altercation that police would let him go because he was “a nice kid.”

“They will slam your head on the cop car because you’re practically guilty until proven innocent,” she said. She explained to them, as many people believe, that black men cannot own large or luxury vehicles without the risk of becoming victim to racial profiling. Both of my brothers are under the age of fifteen.

It seemed difficult at first to believe that the police in Miami would engage in blatant, unacceptable, or racially-charged behavior considering the city’s hailed diversity. One of the four-pronged objectives of the Miami-Dade Police Department, according to the department’s government webpage, is to treat all people with respect through demonstrating an “understanding of ethnic and cultural diversity.” In fact, it would be difficult to authentically achieve the three other stated values of integrity, service and fairness without cultural understanding of the county’s diverse communities. However, the MDPD’s recent history of targeting a specific minority population does not uphold the standards they seek to meet.

The MDPD has led a legion of fatal attacks on black men, which may conjure the names of fallen men like DeCarlos Moore, Travis McNeil and Raymond Herrise. The recent arrest of a fourteen-year-old Tremaine McMillian for giving officers “dehumanizing stares” after verbal reprimand, only further validates the racially-charged persecution of black males that seems to be deeply imprinted in the county’s law enforcement agencies.

McMillian was roughhousing with another child on Haulover Beach this May but it was his body language while he was walking away that prompted police to “neutralize the threat” the teen caused by attacking and detaining him. The 2011 death of Raymond Herrise, who fell victim to over one-hundred bullets fired at his vehicle, was induced by what police officers say was a posed threat in a speeding car. Herrise’s car was actually at rest, according to footage from the incident, before several police shot and killed the man and injured four bystanders.

Community outcries of frustration at the MDPD’s questionably racist practices landed the department with a civil-rights investigation conducted by the U.S. Department of Justice late 2011.
But often overlooked by the MDPD’s plausible police stereotyping, a violation of civil rights that is still undergoing examination, is a critical component of the violence that police have taken on the very citizens they seek to protect: fear. A fear, often noted, that is unsupported by physical evidence or substantial reason; a fear that can most easily be described as rooted in an obvious lack of “understanding and cultural diversity.”

The message that the MDPD sends to the black community is hardly one of respect when their services include the scrutiny and persecution of black males.

With populations of racial minorities on the rise, incidents of targeted police brutality need to come to an end. It is impossible, ineffective and ultimately futile for a police force to adequately serve a community that they fail to understand. Officers should be educated on the history of police relationships with black people in efforts to understand the pain that shapes common perception about law enforcement. This is important because the history of police brutality in the black community is not exclusively the story of black people – it is a shared past of both parties. If police officers could first learn about the concerns of the people, then they could take the appropriate steps to actually perform their jobs.