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Posts Tagged ‘Miami’

Our Kids Part II: Foster to Adopt

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | March 1st, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Adoption is the legal transfer of the parental rights and responsibilities from a child’s birth parents to the adoptive parents. But adoption is not the only way to help children in crisis, you may be interested in becoming a foster parent or a Guardian Ad Litem. Two foster parents, Trudy and Lisa, discuss the various challenges in the foster care system. For a prospective adoptive parent, fostering to adopt makes the adoption process easier to navigate. For Trudy and Lisa, parenting through adopting can be one of the most life-changing and yet rewarding experiences, but it is important to understand the adoption process and the different adoption opportunities available. Our Kids of Miami-Dade and Monroe can provide you with additional information and referral services, support groups, adoption-related libraries, case management and training.

Fostering-to-Adopt by Michelle Marie Mlacker on Mixcloud

ZooRush

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | February 22nd, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

ZooRush is a collaboration between the School of Communication and the School of Public Health at the University of Miami. Everyone involved is a student or faculty member of our school. Clay Ewing, the game designer of ZooRush and Assistant Professor, and Nancy, the head of PR for the project, talk about the game the development of the game. The game is part of a larger project at the School of Public Health. The larger project, lead by Dr. Lanetta Jordan,  is a patient registry for sickle cell disease. The purpose of the game is twofold: create awareness about sickle cell disease as well as reduce the stigma associated with the disease amongst teenagers that have it.

ZooRush by Michelle Marie Mlacker on Mixcloud

Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD)

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | January 18th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Founded by a mother whose daughter was killed by a drunk driver, Mothers Against Drunk Driving® (MADD) is the nation’s largest nonprofit working to protect families from drunk driving and underage drinking. MADD also supports drunk and drugged driving victims and survivors at no charge, serving one person every eight minutes through local MADD victim advocates and at 1-877-MADD-HELP. Learn more at www.madd.org or by calling 1-877-ASK-MADD.

Sunday, February 9th, 2014, MADD will be holding a certified 5K walk/run and family festival at Tropical Park. For more information or to register, visit www.walklikemadd.org/miami or call (305)-273-3744

 

 

Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Let’s Talk: Author/Journalist Michael Grunwald on the “New New Deal”

By Hyan Freitas | News Director | November 22nd, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Michael Grunwald is the Senior National Correspondent for TIME Magazine and the author of The New New Deal: The Hidden Story of Change in the Obama Era. It’s a book that has gotten a lot of praise for its descriptions of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, or as you may remember it, the stimulus package passed by President Barack Obama in 2009. He spoke to WVUM to preview his appearance at the Florida Book Awards Panel at the Miami Book Fair this Saturday at 4p.m.

Conversations: Author/Journalist Michael Grunwald on the “New New Deal” by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Let’s Talk: A Conversation on Veterans and PTSD

By Hyan Freitas | News Director | November 16th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Steve Gomez is the author of an opinion piece in the Miami Hurricane newspaper that caught our eye this Veteran’s day, titled: “Make An Effort to Talk to, Thank Veterans”.  The article, as the title suggests, made an appeal for fellow students to acknowledge the veterans studying and/or walking among them.  Gomez himself served in the Air Force, and he also started to inform himself of the incredibly important subject of PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder, after one of his brother-in-arms was diagnosed with it.

This is a serious issue facing our nation’s veterans, but what do we know about it and what can be done to best serve those who have served us?

The Weekly Voice is WVUM’s weekly current affairs discussion show. It airs Fridays at 10 a.m. and is hosted by Hyan F.

Veterans and PTSD by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

“When I write I can do anything…even fly”

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | October 17th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

David Leal is a young man with high career aspirations. Every day he gets closer to finishing his novel despite not being able to physically write it himself. By no means defined by the disease that weakens his muscles daily, David must still work around the effects muscular dystrophy has on his body. There can be no doubt as to the strength of his character and fortitude of mind and though his body grows weaker, his mind only increases in perception and creativity. David and his team join Shelly Lynn on an episode of ‘Not For Profit’ to talk about his upcoming novel.

When I write I can do anything, even fly. by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

A discussion on the sex trafficking industry

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | September 8th, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Victoria Morales and Barbara Padron lead outreach teams in Hialeah, Biscayne Blvd and Miami Beach. This is part of Sharing One Love Outreach program. http://sharingonelove.org/  They’ve been conducting outreaches for the entire year and have repeatedly come across locations and information about the possible sex trafficking of local runaway children. They also connect with local groups, law enforcement and business owners to increase awareness and the identification and rescue of children that are at-risk of being commercially sexually exploited.

A typical outreach includes the following activities:

  • All first time volunteers receive street outreach training.
  • Volunteers form into small groups and identify local businesses to share information on Human Trafficking and the vulnerability of runaway children to being commercially sexually exploited.
  • Volunteers also handout flyers with red flags on on how employees can identify and report suspected human trafficking.
  • Groups also show pictures of missing children from the community to employees and record and report and possible sightings and relevant information.
  • Participants also complete surveys of areas that show signs of suspected commercial sexual activity. This data is used to identify areas that benefit or profit in facilitating human trafficking and other forms of commercial sexual abuse and exploitation.

A discussion on the sex trafficking industry by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Interview: Indie Film Club Miami

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | September 1st, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Indie Film Club Miami is a non-profit organization that fosters the growth, skills and cohesiveness of the South Florida film industry, by working closely with filmmakers and digital media content creators. It hosts a variety of events including monthly screenings, as well as regular workshops, and networking events that bring together our diverse community. Diliana Alexander, Executive Director at Indie Film Club, spoke with us about the importance of independent cinema and transmedia. Shelly Lynn alongside Natasha Mijares and Diliana Alexander talk about the different facets of film and how crucial it is to our community, to encourage creativity and build upon it for a more expressive society.

Indie Film by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Race and Justice in America: A Counterpoint Special

By Hyan Freitas | News Director | July 21st, 2013 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Below you’ll find the full audio of Counterpoint’s roundtable discussion on race and justice in America.  We dedicated the entire Counterpoint hour to these topics in light of conversations that have started across the nation following the not guilty verdict in the trial of George Zimmerman.

We also split the show into three segments in case there is a specific topic that might be of more interest than another or if you tuned in late when it aired live.  Each has its own player below.

Part I: Reactions to the Verdict

Part II: A conversation on racial profiling: Is it an issue?

Part III:  The American Justice System:  Is it unfair to minorities?

Counterpoint: Race and Justice Special Edition [Full Audio] by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

 

Counterpoint Race and Justice Special: Reactions to the Zimmerman trial by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Counterpoint Race and Justice Special- Discussing Racial Profiling by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Counterpoint Race and Justice Special: Race and the justice system by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

This special aired July 19, 2013 | Counterpoint airs live Fridays at 1pm EST on WVUM 90.5FM | WVUM.org

SCOTUS Decision: I’m Pleading the 5th

By William Ng | Counterpoint | June 26th, 2013 | SHOW COMMENT(1)

On June 17th, the Supreme Court decided to pass a “landmark decision” in regards to Salinas v. Texas which impacts how one can go about claiming the right to not incriminate oneself (otherwise known as “pleading the fifth”).  The decision essentially stated that when an individual is not placed under arrest, the individual must explicitly evoke their 5th amendment right and that simply remaining silent does not mean their right has been evoked.  Depending upon the circumstances, this silence can be used to infer possible guilt of the party in question.

To really understand the context of this ruling, let me first start with a quick background to this decision.

This all started with a murder case conducted in a Texas state court.  In 1992, Houston police officers found two homicide victims.  The investigation had then led officers to Genovevo Salinas. Salinas voluntarily agreed to accompany the officers to the police station, where he was then questioned.  At this time, Salinas was not under arrest and had not been read his Miranda rights.  Salinas had the ability to leave at any point while he was being questioned.

Salinas answered every question until an officer asked him whether the shotgun shells found at the scene of the crime would match the shotgun found in Salinas’ home.  At this point, the defendant fell silent and “looked down at the floor, shuffled his feet, bit his bottom lip, clenched his hands in his lap, and began to tighten up” (according to the statements made by the state prosecutor).

A ballistics analysis later matched Salinas’ gun with the casings at the scene.  Police also found a witness who said Salinas admitted to killing the victims.  In 1993, Salinas was charged with the murders, but he could not be found until 15 years later.

During the trial, the prosecution introduced the evidence of Salinas’ silence and body language in response to the question about the gun casings.  Salinas objected, arguing that he could invoke his Fifth Amendment protection against self-incrimination.  The trial court admitted the evidence and Salinas was found guilty and sentenced to 20 years in prison and a $5,000 fine.

The question boiled down to whether or not Salinas’ body language is allowed to be presented as evidence.

I say YES!

First of all, Salinas had the ability to leave the questioning period any time he liked.

All of his answers from this questioning period were applicable to be used in court as evidence.  Since he did not leave nor claim his right to not self incriminate, I believe that the answer his body language gave is also admissible in court.

There’s been plenty of dissenting chatter in the public sphere about Supreme Court’s decision to allow this piece of evidence stand.  Personally, I think it’s time for these chatters of dissent to stop. Ladies and gentlemen please plead the fifth!

Now we are all very familiar with our fifth amendment rights.  Just to recap a bit, the pertaining part of the 5th amendment in this case is “No person shall be…compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself”.  There are other things the amendment guarantees such as our right in regards to double jeopardy, due process, and eminent domain. The important thing here to focus on is the ability to not self incriminate.

Some people will argue that to not self incriminate is a natural right.

I think they are only partially right.

If one really focused on the language of the Constitution, the key word is compelled.  We are allowed the right to not be forced into incriminating ourselves but that does not stop you from doing it freely.

The Miranda rights are read to you because you are in custody, and you can’t just get up and leave.  If you had incriminated yourself without explicitly knowing your rights under these conditions, the law enforcement officers are essentially forcing incriminating evidence out of you.

Under a different circumstance where you basically waltz into a police department and partake in a questioning period willingly then… anything you say or may do are going to be used against you! (sound familiar?)

There has been all types of people have used their 5th amendment rights in the past, and some of them have gotten off clean while others haven’t.  People such as Don King, Colone Oliver North, Casey Anthony, and even O.J. Simpson have all claimed their right to not incriminate themselves when they were questioned, as well as they should have (and O.J. I’m talking about you especially).

Look, we have all watched enough Law and Order and CSI to know that when you are being questioned, and you get asked that one question where you might start to incriminate yourself…

What do you do?

You shut up and ask for a lawyer.

Salinas paid for his slip up during the questioning period, and he couldn’t answer because he got nervous.  The police had hit the nail on the head.  If he was really trying to evoke his 5th amendment right, we would definitely all be made aware of it (it’s really not that hard).  He got nervous and couldn’t answer because the bullet casings did fit his shotgun.  He got nervous and couldn’t answer because he did murder two innocent people in their own home.  He got nervous and couldn’t answer probably because he started planning for his 15 years of hide-and-seek with law enforcement.  

The take away from this Supreme Court decision?

You have the right to not self-incriminate.

USE IT.