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Posts Tagged ‘News’

Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD)

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | January 18th, 2014 |

Founded by a mother whose daughter was killed by a drunk driver, Mothers Against Drunk Driving® (MADD) is the nation’s largest nonprofit working to protect families from drunk driving and underage drinking. MADD also supports drunk and drugged driving victims and survivors at no charge, serving one person every eight minutes through local MADD victim advocates and at 1-877-MADD-HELP. Learn more at www.madd.org or by calling 1-877-ASK-MADD.

Sunday, February 9th, 2014, MADD will be holding a certified 5K walk/run and family festival at Tropical Park. For more information or to register, visit www.walklikemadd.org/miami or call (305)-273-3744

 

 

Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD) by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Let’s Talk: A Conversation on Veterans and PTSD

By Hyan Freitas | News Director | November 16th, 2013 |

Steve Gomez is the author of an opinion piece in the Miami Hurricane newspaper that caught our eye this Veteran’s day, titled: “Make An Effort to Talk to, Thank Veterans”.  The article, as the title suggests, made an appeal for fellow students to acknowledge the veterans studying and/or walking among them.  Gomez himself served in the Air Force, and he also started to inform himself of the incredibly important subject of PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder, after one of his brother-in-arms was diagnosed with it.

This is a serious issue facing our nation’s veterans, but what do we know about it and what can be done to best serve those who have served us?

The Weekly Voice is WVUM’s weekly current affairs discussion show. It airs Fridays at 10 a.m. and is hosted by Hyan F.

Veterans and PTSD by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Promoting Education in America

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | November 16th, 2013 |

After speaking with Anthony Reid, Forever Bloom Alliance Founder and Director, and Jeremie McLeod, FBA Creative Director, there is little doubt the non-profit organization does not have a permanent impact on the youth who go through its programs. Anthony Reid who is a school teacher and adamant proponent for unity within the public school system, has brought together mentors, volunteers, and other professionals to collaborate in projects and programs helping promote education for the youth in America.

For more information: visit http://foreverbloom.org/

Forever Bloom Alliance by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

WVUM News Special: Philippines Relief Efforts

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | November 16th, 2013 |

Rolly Aberion, Miami Area Coordinator, spoke with Shelly Lynn about the recent disaster in the Philippines and the necessity of everyone coming together, supporting the relief efforts going on right now. The situation is time sensitive, the sooner we get supplies to the devastated regions, the faster the damage will be repaired.

For more information: visit http://gk-usa.org or email rollyaberion@gmail.com

Philippines Relief Efforts by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Healthcare Q and A with President Shalala

By Hyan Freitas | News Director | September 23rd, 2013 |

WVUM News had the opportunity to participate in a student media Q and A with UM President Donna Shalala. She answered questions and provided insights on President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, commonly referred to as Obamacare.  President Shalala is the former Secretary for Health and Human Services under President Bill Clinton.

Afterwards, Meg, Jordan and Matt from ‘Counterpoint’ weighed in with their own thoughts.

‘Counterpoint’ airs Fridays at 1pm EST.

Obamacare Q and A with President Shalala by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

From Under the Bridge to Into Our Hard Drives: Patent Trolls

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | September 13th, 2013 |

(Image credit: iDownloadBlog)

 

You might be wondering “what on Earth is a patent troll?”, so I’ll tell you– “patent troll” is a label for any person/company/firm/etc. that makes a business of threatening to people for alleged patent infringement: almost homogeneously, these people buy patents from other companies/inventors with absolutely zero intention of using the patents for anything other than ammunition for litigation (not to be confused with the MPAA, the RIAA, or the copyright system in general). Rather than using patents in their intended manner– to ensure an inventor has time to complete his/her invention– the patent troll uses the temporary legal monopoly granted with a patent as a means to extort money from inventors who come up with new ideas/inventions or extensions on previous ideas/inventions that may at first glance seem similar to the patents which the patent trolls hold. It is estimated that any actual litigation that is brought by patent trolls and does not get settled before a court battle leads to the patent trolls losing over 75% of the time.

The patent trolls are not a new phenomenon, but they certainly have grown to prominence since the rise of big software. Software development is unique in that software’s “life” goes by considerably faster than most physical items and it is often the case that something becomes standardized in a fraction of the time of physical items. This creates the opportunity for mass patent trolling: if someone obtains a patent for a piece of software that has become a standard before the patent has expired, it is incredibly likely that someone somewhere has made an improvement on that standard, and since this improvement was not done by the patent holder, the patent troll has a prime opportunity to launch a legal missile. Another litigation-mongering opportunity occurs when a piece of closed-sourced software (not free for everyone to tinker with) resembling an open-sourced software (free for everyone to tinker with) that is not well known gets a patent, and since the open-sourced software wasn’t patented, the new patent owner can try to sue, even if the closed-source software was developed after the invention or even adoption as a standard.

These scenarios sound perfectly viable for patent trolls, but in reality, the “perfect patent troll situation” rarely occurs. Most often, the later example– of closed-source software patents being used to attack open-sourced software– is the case. Or not at all; sometimes the patent trolls simply choose someone who has just enough money to pay a settlement, but not enough to want to go to war with the patent trolls, which can get pretty costly, easily reaching the millions mark for a regular patent case. This is where the problem lies: the immoral patent trolls lose over 75% of the time, but simply by bringing a suit, they are almost guaranteed a settlement because the target often won’t be able to afford a lawsuit, even if they are innocent.

The solution? Make it so that it’s in the patent trolls best interest to be actually right about bringing a suit. Make it so that the plaintiff pays the fees if the case is found to be a pile of garbage. This would make it so that the average target of the patent trolls would be able to go to court and win ~75% of the time. This isn’t a fix in itself, but it’s a start. To be honest, I think the entire patent system is far outdated and needs to be updated from scratch to the modern world. Somewhere in that reform, I think the best way to stop wrong patent lawsuits is to place risk on the accuser as opposed to how it is now where the risk is all on the defendant. As a side note, it would be nice if there were no software patents, given the building-block nature of software itself, but I seriously doubt that a majority would go along with removing patents for software.

 

Not Aiding the Enemy, But Still Found Guilty

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | July 31st, 2013 |

Image Source: (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

Unsurprisingly, I’m writing about Bradley Manning this week. In case you missed it, Bradley Manning has finally been given a verdict: guilty of more than a handful of crimes, but not guilty of one very important charge– aiding the enemy. I’ll get more into the specifics of that charge later, but the remaining 20 charges carry a combined maximum of 136 years in prison, so PFC Manning is anything but in the clear. The sentencing has already begun, and could last into the last days of August.

I’ve written on Manning before, so I won’t go into the back-story again, but I think it’s worth mentioning that he has already spent three years in prison before his trial, so it has been agreed upon that his sentence should be reduced by 1,274 days. Anyway, time to move onto the big charge: aiding the enemy and why even though he has been found guilty of other crimes, this one is a win for whistleblowers. Most of the logic behind going after Manning as harshly as the military did was something along the lines of “if it’s available for everyone in the world to see, then that includes our enemies, so therefore public disclosures are equal to giving the information directly to the enemy.” As I’ve argued before, this is not the case here, even though that line of reasoning may seem valid, one must take intent into account: if one’s intention is to truly “aid the enemy,” then it follows that one would not inform one’s own side of such aid, as making information public would. Instead, by releasing information publicly, it allows both sides to see it, giving a “heads-up” to both parties: the “enemy” side gets information X and the “non-enemy” side gains the information that the “enemy” side has information X, which could be useful to the “non-enemy” side.

Further to that point, Manning’s information was not immediately disclosed; it was given to Wikileaks, providing a window of time in which the military could have changed tactics, had any even been compromised in the first place. Given those two points, I believe Manning when he says that he was merely a whistleblower rather than a traitor.

As for the other charges: any wrongdoing Manning may have done is far outweighed by the benefit to the public’s right to know. This should be true of all whistleblowers: exposing something that needs to be exposed should not come with a life imprisonment threat.

More on the PFC Manning case this Friday during the show [1pm EST].

Counterpoint Recap 7/26: The Value of Higher Education

By Meg McGee | Counterpoint | July 29th, 2013 |
Counterpoint's Meg McGee has "the last word" after every new edition of Counterpoint.  After reading her latest recap, hear audio of the discussion she's referencing embedded below the post:

On Friday’s show, we covered a slue of topics, the smoking ban on campus, the Miami-Dade county’s decision to take funding out of libraries, Detroit’s bankruptcy, and the passing of a student loan deal in Congress.

Our entire panel agreed that the cost of college/university is skyrocketing and something should be done to change it. However, our topic grew into a larger discussion over if college is valuable in order to succeed. Matt De La Fe, our conservative contributor, argued that college degrees aren’t necessary for success and that there are plenty of jobs one can go into without a degree. While I think this argument is valid (to an extent), it is far from the reality we live in these days. Yes, there are celebrities, athletes, musicians, artists, and other innovative people in our society that make millions of dollars without having finished college. But the chances of that happening to an average Joe are not that high and if nothing else, a Bachelor’s degree is a safety net in case your multi-million dollar idea goes awry.

Everyone knows the economy and job market is bad, especially for young Americans and post-grads. So naturally, having a college degree gives you a slight advantage over someone who only has a high school diploma. The days of skipping out on college are over, there is no Woodstock, there are no protest movements, millennials have to get to work. We have to go to college and college is not cheap. So while there is no one putting a gun to our heads forcing us to take out enormous loans for college, our society leaves us with few other choices. For me, I have to go to school for what I want to do and not just undergrad but grad school and PhD. program. I think a lot of young Americans are taking huge risks by having $100k in loans but it certainly beats the alternative to working at McDonald’s with no degree. A college degree is the new high school diploma.

Until our country is able to get the costs of education down across the board, we will see more students not being able to go to a 4-year institution and instead having a high-unemployment rate for young adults. Though Congress passed this deal, there are still provisions in it to keep interest rates rising on student loans. I think student loan debt is a problem that Wall Street is cashing in on and once the “bubble” explodes, we could see another financial crisis affecting the next generation of Americans.

Below is audio of the discussion on student loans and the value of a college degree.  Counterpoint airs live Fridays at 1p.m. EST

Counterpoint Clip: Student Loans and the Costs of College by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

 

Counterpoint Clip: Eyes on SCOTUS

By WVUM News Staff | June 25th, 2013 |

Counterpoint: Eyes On SCOTUS by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

 

The Counterpoint team presents their preliminary thoughts on the historic cases in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in 2013 including looks at the Voting Rights Act and two cases regarding same-sex marriage.  Aired June 21, 2013.

Counterpoint is live Fridays at 1pm ET on WVUM 90.5FM in South Florida and worldwide at WVUM.org

7 Reasons Why Arming the Syrian Rebels Is A Bad Idea

By Meg McGee | Counterpoint | June 21st, 2013 | SHOW COMMENT(1)
  1. Obama’s “red line” was the use of chemical weapons in the Syrian civil war— and now the US is arming the rebels. The incident of the use of sarin gas on the battlefield only caused 150 deaths compared to the 90,000 deaths caused by conventional warfare.
  2. We’ve seen the same rhetoric pre-Iraq war with the promise of WMDs as a reason to intervene militarily.
  3. We’ve also seen the same premise of arming the rebels to defeat a common enemy of the people and the United States (The Mujahideen in Afghanistan). 
  4. The types of military support the US is offering is not enough to topple Assad’s regime but only to exacerbate an already bloody war. 
  5. We have no way of controlling who the arms are given to. Al-Nursa is one of the opposition groups that have openly stated their connection to al-Qaeda.
  6. Supporting the rebels does not mean we have allies in this war. Non-state actors are unpredictable and don’t need to claim allegiance to any country.
  7. Syria has become the stage for competing international interests in the Middle East. Russia and Iran supporting the Assad regime and the West (US, UK, France, Germany) supporting the opposition; making it a proxy war.