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Posts Tagged ‘United States’

N4P: All People Are Equal, But Some People Are More Equal Than Others?

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | December 6th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

The Women’s Fund Miami-Dade improves the lives of women and girls through grant making, research, advocacy and education. Their vision is to create a community where all women and girls have equal access, opportunity and influence. Women and girls thrive when they have the right to safety, opportunity and self-determination in every aspect of their lives. When we invest in women, we are investing in the future prosperity of our community.

N4P: All People Are Equal, But Some People Are More Equal Than Others? by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

N4P: Empowering Young Women Through Music

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | November 29th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Chantil Dukart, a recent graduate from the University of Miami’s Frost School of Music, joins Shelly on N4P to talk about her debut album, “In The Beginning.” In a world filled with divas, Chantil stands out as one who is comfortable in her own skin. She talks about what it is like to stay true to herself despite the harsh demands of the music industry. Her music encourages young girls to stay confident, motivating them to act with autonomy.

 

N4P: Writing and Recording Music by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

N4P: Should You Go To Law School?

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | November 22nd, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Ann Levine graduated from the University of Miami’s Law School in 1999. Since then, she has helped more than 2,000 law school applicants. Law school is challenging, with a lot of pressure placed on the students to succeed academically. So why does one go to law school? For the money, for the magical $160,000 that recent law school grads made fresh out of school? There is so much good that can be done, actual changes that can be made with a law degree.

N4P: Should You Go To Law School? by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

N4P: Brian Cuban-Eating Disorders Do Not Discriminate

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | November 15th, 2014 | LEAVE A COMMENT

Men and body image are usually not associated with each other. More and more we hear about the issue of photo shopping women’s bodies to make them look thinner or in some places bigger. There is a lot of media attention on just how ridiculous the body proportions are supposed to be for females aspiring to that ultimate goal of beauty and really acceptance in society. But what you don’t hear very often are the stories of men who struggle with the same issues of body acceptance. Those men who you’d never assume even think about body image. Brian Cuban talks to Shelly about his experiences with anorexia and bulimia and how he overcame those eating disorders with the right support system. His book, Shattered Image, recounts his life story.

For resources on eating disorders you can head over to the counseling center at the University of Miami or call them at 305 284- 5511

N4P: Brian Cuban-Eating Disorders Do Not Discriminate by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

“When I write I can do anything…even fly”

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | October 17th, 2013 |

David Leal is a young man with high career aspirations. Every day he gets closer to finishing his novel despite not being able to physically write it himself. By no means defined by the disease that weakens his muscles daily, David must still work around the effects muscular dystrophy has on his body. There can be no doubt as to the strength of his character and fortitude of mind and though his body grows weaker, his mind only increases in perception and creativity. David and his team join Shelly Lynn on an episode of ‘Not For Profit’ to talk about his upcoming novel.

When I write I can do anything, even fly. by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Not Aiding the Enemy, But Still Found Guilty

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | July 31st, 2013 |

Image Source: (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

Unsurprisingly, I’m writing about Bradley Manning this week. In case you missed it, Bradley Manning has finally been given a verdict: guilty of more than a handful of crimes, but not guilty of one very important charge– aiding the enemy. I’ll get more into the specifics of that charge later, but the remaining 20 charges carry a combined maximum of 136 years in prison, so PFC Manning is anything but in the clear. The sentencing has already begun, and could last into the last days of August.

I’ve written on Manning before, so I won’t go into the back-story again, but I think it’s worth mentioning that he has already spent three years in prison before his trial, so it has been agreed upon that his sentence should be reduced by 1,274 days. Anyway, time to move onto the big charge: aiding the enemy and why even though he has been found guilty of other crimes, this one is a win for whistleblowers. Most of the logic behind going after Manning as harshly as the military did was something along the lines of “if it’s available for everyone in the world to see, then that includes our enemies, so therefore public disclosures are equal to giving the information directly to the enemy.” As I’ve argued before, this is not the case here, even though that line of reasoning may seem valid, one must take intent into account: if one’s intention is to truly “aid the enemy,” then it follows that one would not inform one’s own side of such aid, as making information public would. Instead, by releasing information publicly, it allows both sides to see it, giving a “heads-up” to both parties: the “enemy” side gets information X and the “non-enemy” side gains the information that the “enemy” side has information X, which could be useful to the “non-enemy” side.

Further to that point, Manning’s information was not immediately disclosed; it was given to Wikileaks, providing a window of time in which the military could have changed tactics, had any even been compromised in the first place. Given those two points, I believe Manning when he says that he was merely a whistleblower rather than a traitor.

As for the other charges: any wrongdoing Manning may have done is far outweighed by the benefit to the public’s right to know. This should be true of all whistleblowers: exposing something that needs to be exposed should not come with a life imprisonment threat.

More on the PFC Manning case this Friday during the show [1pm EST].

The NSA Leaks A Week Later: What Next?

By Mike Kanoff | Counterpoint | June 13th, 2013 |

Over the weekend it was revealed that the whistleblower behind the NSA leaks was a man named Edward Snowden. Snowden is presumably in Hong Kong, although there hasn’t been any confirmation yet, other than the fact that he checked out of a hotel there recently. There has also been chatter about Snowden having a bid for political asylum, though there has been no official confirmation or denial of such asylum at the time of writing, be it from China, Iceland, or Russia, the three nations allegedly weighing the possibility, with only Russia officially “considering” asylum.

 

That’s all well and good, but what about his homeland, the U.S.? Already, some members of congress are calling for his head, Obama is trying to do damage control, and as stated above, Snowden isn’t even in the country. On the other side, there is already a whitehouse.gov petition to pardon him, even without any charge of wrongdoing so far, and privacy advocates are taking a break from performing the “I Told You So Dance” to show support of the person behind the information.

 

I don’t want this to be another article entirely about whistleblowers, so I’ll shift to the leaks themselves–I wrote last week about the notion that some things shouldn’t be classified to begin with, but this leak goes beyond that. The PRISM program and the Verizon (and I would assume other major telecoms companies) data mining efforts shouldn’t have even been started, and for revealing them, I thank Snowden very much.

 

I believe the best part of these leaks is the re-ignition of the discussion of privacy vs. safety: at what point does “anti-terrorism” become too invasive? At some point during the show last week, I asked “what terrorism?” and by that I was questioning how many terrorism plots were, or even could be, foiled by this type of surveillance. I realize that the CIA/FBI/DHS/etc. have to keep some things secret, but I believe that if they want to even propose this type of surveillance, there had better be concrete, publicly available evidence that it works, and even then, there is no reason that the government needs the metadata on every call. Heck, I call in to Counterpoint from over 1500 miles away for an hour once a week, and I’m sure that could be construed as “odd,” even though I can say with 100% certainty that I am not a terrorist.

 

But what about the one in a million who is a terrorist? Surely we can’t just let him/her continue uninhibited. Do we trust that the government and police can catch most of them? Do we trust each other to be on the lookout for bomb/etc. factories across the country? In all honesty, I don’t know what we can do to stop terrorist attacks from ever happening again, but just because there isn’t an alternative idea at this point in time does not make the surveillance state is a good idea. I can live with the current airport security; it’s a pain, but it’s only a little overzealous. I can get behind the occasional wiretap, but I think a warrant should be required beforehand. I draw the line at the public camera system/Trapwire and Internet monitoring in any form; the first is far too invasive, and the second is too easy for the actual intended targets to circumvent and only harms the bystanders.

 

We have to accept that there are people out there that want to hurt us, be it from some bastardized form of an otherwise peaceful religion, or from run-of-the-mill psychopathy, and I’ll admit that I don’t know how to stop them 100% of the time, but what I do know is that turning America into an Orwellian state out of fear of terrorism would be “letting the terrorists win,” and I’m sure I’m blowing these programs a little out of proportion, but one of the hallmarks of such a state is total surveillance, which, thanks to Snowden, we know is closer than we thought it was last week.

Counterpoint: April 5 | North Korea, Gun Control Legislation

By WVUM News Staff | April 6th, 2013 |

 

 

A discussion of North Korea, Connecticut gun legislature, and Florida’s “Parent Trigger” law.

 

 

Counterpoint: 4/5 by Wvumnews on Mixcloud