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Posts Tagged ‘University of Miami’

Let’s Talk: A Conversation on Veterans and PTSD

By Hyan Freitas | News Director | November 16th, 2013 |

Steve Gomez is the author of an opinion piece in the Miami Hurricane newspaper that caught our eye this Veteran’s day, titled: “Make An Effort to Talk to, Thank Veterans”.  The article, as the title suggests, made an appeal for fellow students to acknowledge the veterans studying and/or walking among them.  Gomez himself served in the Air Force, and he also started to inform himself of the incredibly important subject of PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder, after one of his brother-in-arms was diagnosed with it.

This is a serious issue facing our nation’s veterans, but what do we know about it and what can be done to best serve those who have served us?

The Weekly Voice is WVUM’s weekly current affairs discussion show. It airs Fridays at 10 a.m. and is hosted by Hyan F.

Veterans and PTSD by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

RadioActive—Jogging in Place: The Anti-Hunger Movement in America

By Michael Matthiesen | November 11th, 2013 |

Sunday @ 6PM, To those in the realm of community social change, food charity will never be an adequate response to the hunger crisis. Not only does it fail to put a dent in the problem, by averting our gaze from the real issue—growing inequality—it ends up costing us all in ballooning health care expenditure, lost productivity, unsafe and divided neighborhoods, and unrealized potential. UM Ph.D Candidate Natalie Kivell discussed more on routes this growing social movement can take.

Natalie Brown Kivell is trained in Community Psychology and is an Agent of Social Change whose passion and skill overlap to create an ideal consultant for community and organizational level change. She is very enthusiastic about her work and her community, and she endeavors to support and work with those who continue to make this community a wonderful place to live.

RadioActive—Jogging in Place: The Anti-Hunger Movement in America by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Miami’s Vice City Rollers

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | October 26th, 2013 |

Miami’s Vice City Rollers is a local non-profit organization focused on empowering women and girls through the camaraderie, self-esteem, and fitness that roller derby brings. Not only do they focus on roller derby itself, but they also team with other non-profit organizations to spread community awareness and support. As a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, they are dedicated to fostering national and international competition of amateur athletes in the sport of Roller Derby. Shelly speaks with Bella Belligerent, and Kristen De La Rua, aka De La Ruthless about the origins of Roller Derby. Accepting of every size, color, and career, VCR holds no specific requirements for women interested in roller derby. Come as you are and learn to skate.

For more information on Miami’s Vice City Rollers visit www.miamirollerderby.com. For more info on derby, check out www.wftda.org, Women’s Flat Track Derby Association.

Empowering Women by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

WVUM NEWS Special: End of the NCAA-UM Saga

By WVUM News Staff | October 24th, 2013 |

Chris Wittyngham, WVUM Sports director, reporting:

After years as a football program, a university, and a leadership structure in flux, the NCAA finally handed down sanctions to the University of Miami in relation to the Nevin Shapiro allegations. Many of those allegations were proven true in the report from the Committee on Infractions, but a combination of self-imposed penalties and a tainted investigation by the NCAA allowed Miami to get handed relatively tame penalties.

The most relevant penalties are 9 scholarship reductions over 3 years for the football program, 3 scholarship reductions over 3 years for the basketball program, and a 3 year probationary period that begun Wednesday. With the conclusion of the investigation and the process with the NCAA, Miami will be looking on to several things.

The first is a period for the football program that will hopefully thrive for the first time in a long time. Miami heads into the weekend at 6-0 and ranked #7 in the BCS rankings. Now that this cloud of uncertainty has been lifted, it certainly will allow the program to operate more effective.

Second is a period of further compliance, something discussed by UM President Donna Shalala and Athletic Director Blake James ad nauseam in the aftermath of the announcement. They understand that they simply cannot allow this to happen again and have already implemented measures to do so.

Third is moving on. This era of Miami Hurricanes history has been largely mired by this scandal and it has hung over everything athletically and otherwise that has happened at the University. All parties involved will be glad to move on.

WVUM Special Report–End of the NCAA-UM Saga by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

RadioActive – Disability Rights Movement: A Hidden History

By Michael Matthiesen | October 21st, 2013 |

Disability Rights Movement was an out cry by a group of Americans who just wanted to be treated the same as everyone else. It yielded real attention from the government to assist with the needs of Americans with disabilities which led to the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The movement impact was nationwide, yet rarely discussed in schools.

RadioActive will discussed the Disability Rights Movement with Dr. Ora Prilelltensky, Rochelle Baer, and Sylvia Goncz:

RadioActive: Disability Rights Movement: A Hidden History by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

RadioActive: Bi-Directional Flying and What it Means to be a Gringo.

By Michael Matthiesen | October 18th, 2013 |

RadioActive welcomes University of Miami’s Dr. Ge-Chen Zha and freelance writer for NPR Aida Ramirez. A College of Engineering professor, Dr. Zha was awarded $100,000 grant from NASA’s prestigious Innovative Advanced Concepts program to create a supersonic, bi-directional flying wing (SBiDir-FW) that looks like something out of Star Wars. Dr. Zha’s fuel-efficient supersonic jet is capable of taking passengers to destinations in less time than current conventional aircraft.

Aida Ramirez, a Miami native and UM Young alum, will be discussing “Who, Exactly, Is A Gringo?” – her article that was published by NPR, together with how the slang term has evolved overtime and who may classify as a gringo in the future.

RadioActive: Bi-Directional Flying and What it Means to be a Gringo. by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

“When I write I can do anything…even fly”

By Shelly Lynn | NFP | October 17th, 2013 |

David Leal is a young man with high career aspirations. Every day he gets closer to finishing his novel despite not being able to physically write it himself. By no means defined by the disease that weakens his muscles daily, David must still work around the effects muscular dystrophy has on his body. There can be no doubt as to the strength of his character and fortitude of mind and though his body grows weaker, his mind only increases in perception and creativity. David and his team join Shelly Lynn on an episode of ‘Not For Profit’ to talk about his upcoming novel.

When I write I can do anything, even fly. by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Healthcare Q and A with President Shalala

By Hyan Freitas | News Director | September 23rd, 2013 |

WVUM News had the opportunity to participate in a student media Q and A with UM President Donna Shalala. She answered questions and provided insights on President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, commonly referred to as Obamacare.  President Shalala is the former Secretary for Health and Human Services under President Bill Clinton.

Afterwards, Meg, Jordan and Matt from ‘Counterpoint’ weighed in with their own thoughts.

‘Counterpoint’ airs Fridays at 1pm EST.

Obamacare Q and A with President Shalala by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Counterpoint Recap 09/13: Chartwells Walk-Out

By Meg McGee | Counterpoint | September 16th, 2013 |

Last Friday’s show included audio from the Chartwells walk-out protest and Counterpoint’s Jordan Lewis, Mike Kanoff, and William Ng were able to witness. They heard the strikers grievances not just about their own jobs but the greater impact of UM in their community. Most notably, Miss Betty, a favorite at UM after Chartwells dismissed her over a simple misunderstanding was present as well as other community leaders. Miss Betty stressed how the Chartwells workers provide students with delicious meals but many employees cannot even feed their own families. This comment particularly struck me because I realize being able to attend a university is apart of the American dream but the reality is that many cannot afford this opportunity. Betty was grateful that one of her sons was able to attend UM but most people on minimum wage don’t have the means to do so. Our privilege at this university juxtaposed with the unfair wages that the worker whether from Chartwells or UNICO is a reflection of the deep income disparities our country.

So is this just a Chartwells problem or is it a UM problem? It’s both. We do business with Chartwells and expect them to have not just fair business practices but also fair treatment of their workers. UM should pressure Chartwells to do the right thing and increase wages, include healthcare, and cut long hours. Why? It is because UM has a reputation to uphold as well as a high price tag. That in turn, should buy students not just meals but provide decent wages for the workers.

Another one of commentators, Michael Fuentes, made the argument against increasing wages because minimum wage jobs are not meant to be permanent, and that people need to “move up the ladder” in terms of economic status. Some minimum wage workers might have that opportunity, while others do not have a choice. There is little room for economic mobility due to the deregulated financial markets that led up to the economic crisis in 2008. The debate should not be over minimum wages but rather over if a person s being paid fairly for the quality and quantity of work they’re doing. Betty urged UM students and faculty to speak out against the unfair treatment of Chartwells workers. We, the students, are the ones paying for this university, so let’s make a difference not just in UM but also in the community by supporting the Chartwells workers and their push to get a higher pay.

Counterpoint 09/13: Chartwells Strike and Obamacare by Wvumnews on Mixcloud

Opinion: A Fight For Us All-We Want More!

By Jordan Lewis | Counterpoint | September 15th, 2013 |

This Thursday, workers at the Hecht-Stanford dining hall worked out of the job. It was an affirmative statement that they want higher wages, better benefits, and more respect in the workplace. They stood up for themselves and other working people, and for that we should be extremely grateful.

The walkout took place at about noon. I was there, waiting with fellow Counterpoint co-hosts, ready to observe the proceedings. The workers were jubilant, happy to defy the wills of their overbearing bosses, if just temporarily. The workers marched along Ponce De Leon Boulevard and generally were well received by passers-by and motorists. The students that came by were supportive of the effort, though most students were not immediately aware of the walkout or the circumstances that preceded it.

The plight of the Chartwell’s workers is a rallying point in the local community. The crowd at the rally was a diverse set of individuals, from local activists, to Democratic Party leaders, to students, and supporters of labor. Father Corbishley, the chaplain of the St. Bede’s Episcopal Church at UM, was quick to mention that the prophets in the Old and New Testament made eradicating poverty a priority. UNICCO workers who recently received a new contract joined in support of the Chartwell’s employees.

The battle for better wages is not isolated to Chartwell’s. One leader wore a shirt that urged for justice at Wal-Mart, another retailer that pays poverty wages. . The societal costs of low wages and mediocre health care coverage are significant. In one such example, a 300-employee Wal-Mart store could cost $1.75 million per year

in taxpayer subsidies. On a similar note, McDonald’s and Visa put together a budget for somebody making $1,105 a month at McDonald’s (and $955 at a second job, because everybody has the ability to work 2 jobs at the same time). They also budgeted no money for gas to heat homes, and $20 for health insurance (basically acknowledging that one can’t afford health insurance under this budget). The situation at Chartwell’s is not too different; workers are forced to choose between important priorities. They live in some of the worst neighborhoods in Miami—and many make less than the medium income in these neighborhoods. Chartwell’s recently raised the cost of a meal at the dining hall by $1.75 but did not pass on any of those proceeds to its workers, many of whom have been there for over 10 years.

As students, we come to learn important skills such as problem solving and critical analysis; we also should learn how to be proper citizens. A good citizen lifts others in need. The Chartwells workers took a chance to fight for the rights of working people. According to Miss Betty, victory belonged to the Chartwells workers on Thursday. A fair contract isn’t just a victory for Chartwells employees; it’s a victory for the community, for the students, and for millions of Americans who work towards their American Dream every day.

Click the hyperlink below to listen to our interview with Miss Betty
Miss Betty Interview